Waiting for Kate, King Solomon, TBC

**A NIGHT OF BLISTERING SKA AND REGGAE!**

WAITING FOR KATE

Waiting for Kate weren’t born, rather they emerged in 2009, kicking and screaming, from the remnants of Cheltenham’s finest Ska band, SKANKt. Adding a big beat, funky, alternative edge to their ska backbone, Waiting For Kate have since been dubbed ‘The party band’ by Venue Magazine. 2010 saw the release of WFK’s debut EP ‘The Loose Goose’, a mini album of class, pulling together a sound as eclectic as, imagine this if you can, a Talking Heads track covered by Groove Armada and performed by Manu Chao! With over a decade of experience, honed from touring the UK with the likes of The Selector, Bad Manners, Capdown and King Prawn, these guys are a formidable live act and one that you certainly don’t want to miss!

KING SOLOMON

King Solomon began as a song-writing project by Kingsley Salmon in 2010 with an aim to produce original UK reggae music. Massive influence from Jamaican and British reggae artists have contributed to this new sound. Artists like Gregory Isaacs, Alborosie, Alton Ellis, Black Roots, The Skints, Restriction and even a little bit of early UB40.

The new 8 piece band are finally stepping on to the stage with a fresh take on an classic music. Described as chilled out, intense, downbeat, regal reggae that will get you dancing.
King Solomon are aiming to make an impact in the music scene and are not to be missed.

TBC

Date: Friday 8 August

Venue: The Frog and Fiddle, 313-315 High St, Cheltenham

Doors: 8.00pm
ENTRY: £4/£3 NUS

Andy Oliveri + friends, Honolulu Knights, colourmejordan at The Frog and Fiddle, Cheltenham

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A rare treat! Local folk singer-songwriter Andy Oliveri will be previewing some new tracks and a small taste of the joyousness he’ll be unleashing on the imminent 2000trees Festival in a couple of weeks time!

http://andyoliverimusic.bandcamp.com/

Joining him will be excellent new electro duo Honolulu Knights formed from the ashes of the critically-acclaimed Aspen Sails!

http://honoluluknights.bandcamp.com/album/moves

Opening the night will be local singer-songwriter colourmejordan with a wide range of influences such as Half Noise, City and Colour and A Great Big Pile of Leaves to name a few.

http://colourmejordan.bandcamp.com/

Date: Friday 4 July 2014

Venue: The Frog and Fiddle, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

Tickets: £4/£3NUS on the door

Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz
Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz
Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz
Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz
Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz
Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz
Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz
Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz

Pictures from the SECRET HOUSE SHOWS on Saturday 24 and Monday 26 May as part of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend. Acts featured: Mark Morriss, Dan Hartland, Adam Kammerling, Luke Concannon, Jimmy Davis, Josh Idehen. Pics by Rachel Miles Edmunds and Brigi Racz

2000trees Festival ticket winner!

We ran a little competition for someone to win a ticket to 2000trees Festival. The simple task was to draw a frightened looking rabbit. The competition was stiff with some very frightened, very rabbit drawings coming our way. However, after much deliberation we could only narrow it down to a final three. So we opened it up to a vote on our SECRET HOUSE SHOW page. The eventual winner was Mary Addison with…

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The other two in the final shortlist were:

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Danielle Kenyon

And:

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Molly Rudoni

Thanks to everyone who took part and especially to Molly and Danielle for two brilliant entries!

Win yourself a ticket to 2000trees Festival 2014!

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I write this listening to the rain lashing against the living room window, puddles forming on the garden path with all of this happening against a backdrop of grey-like-slate skies.

It’s at times like these you really appreciate the comforts of a warm home. It’s also at times like these you wish you hadn’t locked yourself out of the warm home and that you were in the warm home listening to the rain from the comforts of the warm f*cking home. 

Anyway, since that last paragraph I’m now in the comforts of the warm f*cking home. The owners will be back soon though, so I’ll be quick:

Point being, the home isn’t important right now - 2000trees Festival is. Having been set up in 2007 by a group of music-loving friends, 2000trees was born out of frustration with the ever increasing corporate sponsorship and ‘musical merry-go-round’ nature of the larger mainstream British festivals.

Disillusioned by extortionate ticket prices and over-priced food and drink, this band of festival veterans vowed to take matters into their own hands and in true punk-rock style set about developing the perfect antidote.

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Frank Turner

Flash forward to 2014, the festival is mightier than ever with a growing reputation as one of the best ‘small’ events in the festival calendar. ‘Small’ of course is relative. Up to 5,000 underground music lovers will be pouring into Upcote Farm near Cheltenham between 10-12 July to see the likes of Band of Skulls, Frightened Rabbit, Blood Red Shoes, Dan le Sac vs Scroobius Pip, Public Service Broadcasting, The Bronx and Jamie Lenman. They’ll berubbing shoulders with more local acts such as Atrevido, Andy Oliveri, EMP!RE, Kitten and Bear, The Cadbury Sisters and Joe Summers

It’s on this very issue of the continued support and development of local, grassroots music that 2000trees has traditionally set itself apart from many other festivals. 2014, however, sees them take it even further.

The festival will feature two ‘bigger and better’ new stages named in tribute to now fallen music venues in Cheltenham and Bristol. It is also backing the national campaign to save independent music venues from closure.

The Axiom stage, named after a famous former music spot in Cheltenham will feature the very best new and underground rock and indie music including Wolf Alice who recently featured on the front cover of NME. While The Croft, named after a similar venue in Bristol, will see more acoustic and folk acts performing.

There will also be a new wooded area called Forest Sessions at the award-winning festival, taking the total to six stages plus three busking boxes for the public to perform on too.

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Treehouse Stage

Founder James Scarlett backed the ‘Save our Venues’ campaign which is gathering speed across the UK and promised the changes will make ‘amazing new additions’ to the festival.

“Many of the UK’s independent music venues are under serious threat which is a really big problem for the industry,” he said. “We want to highlight this by naming our new stages in tribute to important local venues that have sadly already closed.

“These are the places where acts like Frank Turner and Frightened Rabbit cut their musical teeth and without them the UK music scene will be further flooded by major label signings and X-Factor winners.

“We urge music fans to support their local venues and their local festivals too. Either use them or lose them.”

Fancy winning a ticket to 2000trees Festival?! Yes, yes you do.

All you have to do is this: draw us a picture of a frightened rabbit. Yep, use MS Paint, pen, paper, crayon - whatever you want and draw a rabbit looking frightened! Post the image on your tumblr and point us to it! Or tweet it/Instagram it to us @CheltenhamUnder and tag it #cheltenhamunderground. Or… post it to our Facebook page

We’ll choose the best one by 6pm on TUESDAY 27 May to win the ticket… COMMENCE!

Interview with Mark Morriss

This coming Saturday, Mark Morriss will be joining us for our May SECRET HOUSE SHOW and the third day of our Decent Days and Nights Weekend. He’ll be joined by Cheltenham-based Americana/folk singer-songwriter Dan Hartland and London spoken word artist Adam Kammerling

He took a few minutes out to answer some questions before stepping into the house on Saturday night:

Q. Your latest record, A Flash of Darkness, has a much fuller sound than your 2008 solo debut, which in many ways had a more familiar ‘folky’ vibe adopted by many singer-songwriters. Can you talk a little about that decision?

A: When I was recording the first album, Memory Muscle, there was the definite intention to try to make a ‘summer’ album. A record which I hoped would evoke in others the feelings that certain of my favourite records (Forever Changes, Harvest, Rumours) evoked in me. Bright but melancholy.

When approaching the new album, with the songs I had collected together, it was always going to be a brasher, noisier affair.
There are some quieter and more reflective moments on the album, I realise, but as a whole I was aiming for something more bombastic.

Q. And why the six-year wait? Has A Flash of Darkness been a gradual piece of work?

A: Well for one thing, I was a member of The Bluetones, and that took up a lot of my time, but yes the new album was written over a couple of years, with one final splurge of creativity in early 2012. 

There was the 2010 release of A New Athens, then a tour to support that, then the decision to call it a day, then a tour for that. Then a period of not knowing what I was going to do next. then A.F.O.D. Which took about 6 years all in all. With a few episodes of Pointless thrown in for good measure.

Q. Despite its obvious breadth, much has still been made of the autobiographical influences on this latest LP - the folding of The Bluetones and so on - and that suggests the usual confessional reading of a singer-songwriter’s output. How do you avoid that cliche of the bedsit troubador sharing his pain?

A: To be honest, it’s only much later, long after the songs are written that I’m really able to get a sense of distance from things that I’ve been writing about. When I’m in the process of writing each song feels separate and individual. I often think I’m writing about other characters when the songs are being formed. It’s only later with the passage of time that I can step back and see that there is more of me in them than I hoped.

Q. You’ve also been composing for David Walliams’ children’s audiobooks. How was that, and is there any other work of fiction you’re dying to write for (please be as ambitious and obscure as humanly possible)?

A: I’ve known David for a number of years, but it was still a surprise when he called me up to ask if I fancied the gig. For me it’s simply a great pleasure to do something musical purely for the joy of playing. The challenge of creating this type of music is also something that I relish, writing for children. I’ve enjoyed being inspired by the things that caught my imagination as a child.

As for creating my own fiction, I guess I can leave that for my memoirs.

Q. You are currently gigging a great deal, in pubs and clubs up and down the land. Alongside your decision to crowd-fund A Flash of Darkness, there’s more than a little of the new economic models of the music business about this stage of your career. What is it like to try and make a living from music in the current climate?

A: It’s certainly trickier than it used to be, but I fundamentally enjoy playing live. The travelling I can take or leave, but being up under a beer light in front of a crowded room is still what I live for.

I think the music industry is a constantly shape-shifting landscape and has always been. Technology and the industry have always gone hand in hand, and one never keeps still dragging the other with it. We have to adapt or be left behind. Which is a right pain in the arse, if I’m honest.

Q. Of course, you’re not an entirely new proposition to audiences, and you have almost two decades worth of songs to draw on. How do you negotiate that Bluetones heritage, particularly live?

A: I see them all as mine. I think I’m lucky to have that catalogue to draw on, and in the heat of battle I’ll play whatever I fancy. People always have the albums to listen to whenever they feel like it, but the sprawling individual nature of the live acoustic gigs is very special. Anything goes.

Q. Is there a grand plan at this stage of your career? Are you goal- or journey-oriented these days?

A: There is no grand plan other than to keep adding to my back cat. and enjoying myself.

Q. At this stage, we usually have a kink for asking the acts what fancy dress they’d wear on stage if we put a metaphorical gun to their heads. But since you’ve been known to appear on stage dressed as a butcher, it might be easier to ask: what costume would you absolutely refuse to wear, and why?

A: Jimmy Saville. He’s only been in the ground a couple of years and already the thing is at overkill.

Q. You’re very active on Twitter (as @TheQuill), and seem something of a natural. Social media is of obvious traditional utility to musicians in terms of building fanbases and the like, but does it - should it? - change the nature of those relationships, too, do you think?

A: To be honest I don’t think of it like that. I joined Twitter for a bit of fun, and then much late started to utilise it for promotional purposes too. That said, 90% of what I contribute to it is still pretty much drivel and brain guff.

Q. For the TL;DR crowd - tell us who Mark Morriss is in 2014, in five words or fewer.

A: Still trying to be loved.

Interview with Edd Donovan and the Wandering Moles

Edd Donovan and the Wandering Moles are a Cheltenham-based folk outfit (and there will be more on the perils of genre anon), but their frontman has done more than his own fair share of wandering: originally hailing from the north-west of England, Edd first came to the town he’ll be playing during the Decent Days & Night Weekend all of twenty-four years ago.

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At the tender age of forty-two, he has now released his debut album. Something To Take The Edge off has received an enthusiastically warm welcome, and Edd’s live shows in support of the record have generated a real buzz. His DD&N gig, then, promises something special. Catch him at the Frog & Fiddle on Thursday 22nd May, supported by Della Lupa, Edd Mann and Nathalie Mac.

In the meantime, here he is to talk about working as a social worker, why he’s still waiting for someone to describe his music properly, and how he has a faintly disappointing aversion to dressing up in other people’s clothing.

Q: Here’s what we know: your name is Edd Donovan. Who’s behind the name?

 A: I was christened Edward Donovan by my parents so I guess I hold them responsible! I shortened it when I was a teenager so it looked better in graffiti on the side of buildings!

 Q: A key part of your story is that you started at this guitar-and-song writing game relatively late. What effect do you think that has had on your music?

A: It just means I haven’t been allowed the opportunity to make a tit of myself in public, by prancing around a stage and pretending to be someone else!  I’m glad to have had the time to develop and refine my art within a protected environment (family and friends) whilst growing up, and that now, as I am reaching my potential, l feel confident I can connect with an audience – a confidence I hope is now more grounded in reality, rather than a delusion! 

Q: Part of the reason you started so ‘late’ is that you took the radical step of having a life beyond your songs. For instance, you work as a social worker. How does this find its way into your songs?

A: I don’t perceive it as in any way radical for one to secure an income for one’s future by getting a job, rather than chasing the dream of being an artist– though I feel very fortunate to have got a job! However, Social Work is a radical force within the controlling and risk-averse state we live in, and, yes, what I experience in my job has given me some great insights into the human condition … and thus whole-heartedly feeds into my reflections and song-writing.

Q: Of course, your act isn’t just you: there are the Wandering Moles to account for, too. Did the band just happen, or was it a deliberate choice for your music?

A: After a while it can get lonely on stage and a bit self-indulgent being the solo artist, but also, there is nothing quite like performing with a good band, and I have recruited a great band, so I’m having a great time. Oh, and it was deliberate!

 Q: Key question: each member of the band must wear fancy dress on stage. Who comes as what?

A: I don’t like fancy dress so I won’t consider your question any longer. Though I did ask Chris Collins (lead guitar) to shave off his hair from his head and face; apply makeup and contort his face whilst performing his solos!

Q: You seem to embrace the dread work ‘folk’ with a lot more eagerness than some other acoustic musicians. What does that word mean for you, and how does your music sit in that company?

A: I’m not the biggest fan of traditional music, but I like modern folk and Americana-type folk. I’m not completely comfortable with the folk tag as it’s a general term and I guess encompasses a large part of what I do - however, I’m still waiting for someone, somewhere, to categorise my sound a bit more interestingly and accurately (and without using the word “shite”)!

Q: Given all that, choose one instrument that you secretly wish was part of your regular line-up but, despite all the careful thought you’ve put into your sound before I came along to ask so inane a question, isn’t. Then explain yourself.

A: I would have liked violin, bass clarinet and piano, as I have Moles on standby with such offerings to contribute, but this recent album was all about simplicity and space and would not have benefited from any more layers. However, the next album is in the forefront of my mind and will be a labour of Mole activity.

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Q: You’re promoting your music very well at the moment, with articles and interviews about the new album all over the shop. How do you find the ‘business’ side of music? How do you engage with it?

A: My manager, partner and mother to our children keeps a sharp focus on the promotion and management of me – she is the wand behind the magic! Paper label records have also worked tirelessly on the business side of things. Together, we have had many fun times experiencing the Wandering Moles grow. Personally, I enjoy contributing some of the creative elements, but become disturbed by some of the realities of the music business and regularly question my motives in all of this.

 Q: Plug your wares here: why should we buy your album/come to your gig/join your fanclub?

You can listen to my music for free – I’m a big believer in tasting something before you eat it!, But ,if you like it, then I urge you to buy it on CD or Vinyl - and support this valuable industry and a local music collective. We have invested a lot of money, time and effort to get this far, but if we don’t make our money back we cease to be. This album is quality from start to finish and deserves a place on your CD rack. Come see us live: we are shit-hot, and you can have a chin-wag with the band and get your CD signed. But before all that, visit us on Facebook and like our page, or sign up to the mailing list via our website. Be part of the movement, be a mole and join us on our journey.

 Q: For the TL;DR crowd: describe your sound in five words or fewer.

Bed-wetting, truth-bearing, heart-warming, ear-worming and worth-sharing! [Strictly speaking, that’s six. – Ed.]

Interview by Dan Hartland  

Dan Hartland writes songs, book reviews and occasionally facetious band interviews. His work has appeared in, amongst other venues, the Los Angeles Review of Books and on the back of train tickets. You can hear more of his music at www.danhartland.com

Interview with Tom Leaper from Benin City

Benin City are headlining the Sunday show at our Decent Days and Nights Weekend on 25 May. They’ve played for us several times since their first appearance in 2010 and seem to get better every time!

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Tom Leaper - Benin City

We interviewed saxophonist and multi-instrumental demon Tom Leaper for a catch-up before their headline show.

Hi Tom! You last played for us in 2013. What have you been up to in the meantime?

We had a great time in 2013. In July we FINALLY released our debut album Fires in the Park which was received well. I know a lot of people don’t like to read their reviews but we can’t help it. Haha. People were really enthusiastic about it which meant a lot to us. We held our first headline show in London in October at Electrowerkz which sold out and we rounded off the year by stroking beards and bashing heads together in the studio with Marc Pell on some new material. We’ve spent the first part of 2014 getting a new EP together which should be with everyone soon. June, we hope.

You had a big musical change of direction a couple of years ago, adjusting the line-up, scrapping a lot of old songs and starting more or less from scratch. What challenges and rewards has that brought?

More rewards than anything else. We found our own sound during that massive period of upheaval and change and created an album that excited some of the right people. An album that we’re proud to build on. Change is good for us I think. If something doesn’t pull the rug from underneath us every now and again I think we’d be worried. Circumstance seems to be a great creative catalyst for us. It keeps us growing and developing as a group.

As a London band, Benin City naturally play a lot of gigs in the capital – what’s your favourite place to play there?

That’s a really difficult question. We’ve been invited to play some great gigs over the last twelve months at some great venues. We’ve played at Hoxton Bar Grill supporting VV Brown and again for a night for In the Woods Festival. We supported the lovely and fantastic MOKO at Electrowerkz and then went back there for our own sell out headline show in October.

We also had a great gig at The Albany Theatre in Deptford where the whole place went mental. It was one of the first shows we had after our album came out and the reception blew us away. People who knew a bit about us and new converts. I think it’s between that show and our show at Electrowerkz for me. They were both very special so now the venues are, by default.

You’ve always had a wide array of influences - do you have any recent recommendations?

Josh [Idehen, Benin City’s vocalist] is such a ferocious consumer of music. I’ve recently slowed down a little on the amount of music I buy, and I’m trying to get to know records a little better now. Like I used to before mp3s completely took over. I’m revisiting some records I bought a while back but rushed through first time. At the moment I’m really in to the Toro Y Moi record, Anything In Return and also the Young Fathers Tapes (One & Two).

Me and Josh also stumbled across a great album called Middle School Swag by fthrsn. Check it out. “Over You” is great track. Also, everything by Kwabs. He’s an incredible talent. If you’ve not checked him out yet, you must.

 I had the pleasure of reviewing your album, Fires in the Park, last year, and it still sounds fresh now. Is it still exciting playing those songs, or are you keen to push forward with new material?

Yeah, we still love playing those tunes. They mean a lot to us and it’s great to see the reaction to them. We’ve started playing a couple of new ones too, which we’ll we be bring along at the end of the month. It’s always a little scary playing new tracks live. Something that works great in the studio might not go down so well on a live show and vice versa. The new ones are pretty bouncy and the reaction’s been great so far.

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Joshua Idehen - Benin City

Are there any bands you’ve played with over the past couple of years that you’ve especially loved?

When we supported MOKO, she blew us away. Backstage she was so sweet and then she gets on stage and just slays it.

Is there anything new you’ll be bringing to the next show? Any new songs or instrumentation, for example…

Two new tracks. One called "Bus", which is about coming home from a great night out. One of those nights to remember, and you come home feeling invincible.

"Long Way Home" is the polar opposite. Everything going wrong; falling over, smashing your head on the pavement, fighting with a policeman. Worst nightmare basically. I’ve yet to ask Josh if any of the lyrics come from personal experience. “No comment” is probably about right.

What’s been your impression of Cheltenham when you’ve come here previously?

We love it in Cheltenham. That’s why we keep coming back. It’s a chilled out town, and for a small place there is such a love of live music. It’s fantastic.

You’re playing at Cheltenham’s Wychwood Festival in June alongside Gabby Young and Bipolar Sunshine. How have you found playing festivals so far?

We’ve had a great time. We’ve been lucky enough to play a lot of the festivals that we’ve aspired to play like Latitude, Standon Calling, Leeds and Reading, In The Woods… It’s been great fun. Being in the studio is great but getting to travel around the country together have fun and play our music to people is amazing. It makes us realise how far we’ve come as a group.

 Where would you like to be in a year’s time?

Top of the album chart? (Got to aim high)

Tom’s final sentiments there dovetail nicely with those of frontman Joshua Idehen, who sang the lin “No chilling ‘til we get top billing” on last year’s “Winning Streak”.

They do indeed have top billing at our show on Sunday 25 May at the Frog and Fiddle, then on Monday 26 May, Joshua will perform a poetry set for us as part of the weekend’s closing show.

DAN BASE

The Decent Days and Nights Weekend

**THURSDAY AT THE FROG AND FIDDLE*

EDD DONOVAN AND THE WANDERING MOLES 
Edd Donovan is a contemporary folk, singer-songwriter. He is inspired by the likes of Cat Stevens, Simon and Garfunkel, Loudon Wainwright and contemporary artists such as Fionn Regan, Fleet Foxes and Nathanial Rateliff. A social worker, father, and musician; he has northern roots but has made Cheltenham his home.

From 2006 onwards, Edd self-released an EP and album, toured a little and garnered some wise and wonderful words on his music:

“Life, according to the Gospel of Edd is something to be cherished. Something we should make the most of.” - BBC Gloucestershire

His EP, House On Fire, will be released on 7th April (download only).
Edd returned to the music scene in 2013 with a new collection of songs and a growing collective of musicians, The Wandering Moles.

His first album, ‘Something To Take The Edge Off’ will be released on 28th April 2014. He will be touring extensively.

Reviews for pre-release copies of the album:

“The sound evokes an imagery that is both genuine and grounded, with lyrics that are steeped in poignant reflection of moments past and present. There is an air of optimism that shines through the music like a ray of sunshine behind stormy clouds.” - folkgeek.net
http://www.edddonovan.co.uk/

DELLA LUPA
Della Lupa is a Brighton based act created by Steph Brown whose native origins combine Italian and Vietnamese. This mixed heritage has driven Della Lupa’s unique sound, which encompasses Latino based tempos, Jazz melodies influenced by Asiatic scales and a lyrical Folk structure. Della Lupa’s debut EP, ‘Of The She Wolf’ was produced by Mercury nominated producer, Jag Jago (The Maccabees, Ghost of A Thousand, Cave Painting) and was released in June 2013. Following the release Della Lupa has played many of “London’s legendary music venues” including The Troubador and Ronnie Scott’s. Recently shortlisted as finalists in the Dawsons/Yamaha 2013 competition with Jools Holland, Della Lupa saw the New Year in on tour, playing some of Ireland’s most reputed venues.
"Della Lupa is a smoky mix of music that one might’ve heard in speakeasies from Harlem to Taipei" -THE SOURCE

“Effortless performers – natural and captivating” - Claire Martin, BBC Introducing

https://www.facebook.com/dellalupa

EDD MANN FEAT. KEVIN MINNEY
Sussex based singer/songwriter and guitarist Edd Mann cut his musical teeth writing and gigging with a variety of bands playing different styles of music; most recently folk quartet Redwood Falls. After two years of live shows, including a support for acclaimed folk guitarist Jim Moray, Redwood Falls disbanded in late 2012. Edd has since been writing and performing as a solo acoustic artist, playing alongside acts as diverse as Chris Woods; author of Percussive Acoustic Guitar, folk rock legends Home Service and award winning alt rockers Electric River. 

www.facebook.com/eddmannmusic 

NATHALIE MAC
A great young talent and one of many jewels in the crown of the University of Gloucestershire’s popular music courses. Her soulful, emotive voice and piano-based tracks have won her many fans already, not least the people at BBC Radio 1 who gave her a slot on the prestigious Live Lounge.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNZs5zIbkUI

***FRIDAY AT THE FROG AND FIDDLE***

COCO AND THE BUTTERFIELDS
COCO AND THE BUTTERFIELDS sprang to life in September 2011 as a humble folk trio. Nowadays they’re more accurately described as a five-strong major kick on the South East music scene- a truly colourful, energetic & crowd-stamping act to be reckoned with, performing their own unique fusion of Folk, Pop and Hip Hop, or “Fip Fok”.

Within the two years since their formation CATB have earned themselves the title of the UK’s best unsigned act, a quarter of a million YouTube hits and have shared a stage with internationally renowned artists King Charles, Bastille, Seasick Steve, The Pogues and Wheatus.

From busking in their hometown of Canterbury, to concert halls, to headlining Rome’s largest unsigned music festival, CoCo and the Butterfield’s fresh sound and raw energy on stage has rapidly gained a large and loyal national following, making them one of the UK’s top up-and-coming bands to watch out for.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_i698QxeFw

Support comes from local singer-songwriter JOE SUMMERS and raw blues/garage duo HARD STAIRS!

SATURDAY SECRET HOUSE SHOW **SOLD OUT**

***SUNDAY AT THE FROG AND FIDDLE***

BENIN CITY
Electro-brass 3-piece from London fronted by acclaimed spoken word artist and Dan le Sac collaborator Joshua Idehen.

Praise for the debut album ‘Fires In The Park’:

‘A sultry piece of Afro dub blues-‘ Q Magazine
‘one of the UK’s most exciting new bands’ –Huffington Post
'a genuinely unique proposition' Clash Mag
'a promising debut' DIY

KING SOLOMON
Mighty Gloucestershire 8-piece reggae band! King Solomon began as a song-writing project by Kingsley Salmon in 2010 with an aim to produce original UK reggae music. Massive influence from Jamaican and British reggae artists have contributed to this new sound. Artists like Gregory Isaacs, Alborosie, Alton Ellis, Black Roots, The Skints, Restriction and even a little bit of early UB40.

The band are finally stepping on to the stage with a fresh take on an classic music. Described as chilled out, intense, downbeat, regal reggae that will get you dancing. 

King Solomon are aiming to make an impact in the music scene and are not to be missed. 

ALL EARS AVOW
Alternative rock 4-piece from Swindon. 

All Ears Avow began in early 2013. The group formed from the ashes of Mortdelamer with the addition of guitarist Jake Wilcock from Tides of Change. They devised their own brand of alternative rock dipping their toes into pop punk and also heavier styles with melodic choruses and fist pumping anthems that leave crowds begging for more. The quartet quickly began gigging around the South from Wales to London and have been leaving quite an impression in their wake.

CHELTENHAM IMPROVISERS ORCHESTRA
15-20 piece group using a broad range of electronic and acoustic instrumentation

£4.00 in advance or £6 OTD

**MONDAY SECRET HOUSE SHOW**

LUKE CONCANNON (NIZLOPI)
Singer-songwriter, activist and member of Nizlopi, Luke Concannon comes to Cheltenham for the final show of The Decent Days and Nights Weekend!

JIMMY PHILLIPS
Birmingham-based poet and songwriter

JOSHUA IDEHEN
Benin City frontman and acclaimed spoken word artist

Tickets £12. Open to The Cheltenham Underground Secret House Show Facebook group and mailing list. Any enquiries about the show should be sent to thecheltenhamunderground@yahoo.com